Weekly Security Summary Around The World

January 12, 2018 Arrunadayy Koul No comments exist

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This week we wrote about Fake Chrome MinerBlock Extension which is playing Video in the background.

Ready for the weekend? Keep calm and read some of the most important news in our weekly cyber security round-up.

1. Wi-Fi Alliance Launches WPA3 Protocol with New Security Features

Probably one of the most important news of this week is about the announcement of the WPA3 protocol, the long-awaited next generation of the wireless network. The new standard of Wi-Fi security will be available for both personal and enterprise wireless devices later this year, and aims at strengthening online safety for everyone.

2. The Top 17 Information Security Conferences of 2018

If you’re planning on improving your cyber security skills and do networking and meet new people from this industry, conferences are always a good idea. The State of Securitycompiled this useful list of the top conferences in information security you may want to attend.

3. Apple Releases iOS 11.2.2 With Security Fixes to Address Spectre Vulnerability

iPhone user? You should know that Apple already released an updated version of iOS, namely 11.2.2.,with security fixes to address Intel’s recent vulnerabilities. This version can be downloaded for free on all eligible devices over-the-air in the Settings app. To access the update, go to Settings –> General –> Software Update.

4. Microsoft January Patch Tuesday Fixes 56 Security Issues, Including a Zero-Day

Microsoft published the January 2018 Patch Tuesday security updates, having fixes for 56 vulnerabilities and three special security advisories with fixes for Adobe Flash, including for the Meltdown & Spectre flaws, and a zero-day.

5. WhatsApp Security Flaws Could Allow Snoops to Slide Into Group Chats

A group of researchers from the Ruhr University Bochum in Germany discovered a security flaw in the popular messaging apps, WhatsApp, that could allow hackers to spy on private group chats. Researchers said “that anyone who controls WhatsApp’s servers could effortlessly insert new people into an otherwise private group, even without the permission of the administrator who ostensibly controls access to that conversation”.

6. Spamhaus Report Shows Many Botnet Controllers Look a Lot Like Legitimate Servers

We recommend reading this report called “Botnet Threat Report” from the Spamhaus Project which, among other activities, keeps track of botnet activity, and the non-profit publishes lists of IP addresses and domains used by botnets for command and control (C&C). Reading this report can help understand how botnet owners choose hosting providers, top-level domains and domain registrars.

7. Microsoft Says Older Windows Versions Will Face Greatest Performance Hits After Meltdown, Spectre Patches

You’ve probably read a lot of news on this topic, but we also suggest this one. Microsoft has confirmed that users of older versions of Windows should expect to “notice a decrease in system performance” after they apply system patches to protect against the Meltdown and Spectre security flaws.

8. Demand for Cybersecurity Talent Rises Sharply

Security experts share their opinions on how to address one of the biggest cyber threat of this industry: the rapidly increasing cybersecurity workforce shortage.

9. Italian Researcher Discovered That Gmail Shutdown After Sending a Zalgo Text

An Italian security researcher, Roberto Bindi, discovered a flaw in Gmail that could be exploited to shut down Gmail by sending to the victim a specially crafted message, impeding the user from accessing his/her email address.

10. Majority of Companies Lack Sufficient IoT Policy Enforcement Tools

A global survey of infosec decision-makers found 92% of respondents have security policies to manage IoT devices, yet 53% lack sufficient tools to enforce the policies, according to a Forrester Research report. Ten percent of the 3,378 survey respondents lacked any tools at all to enforce the policies, Forrester’s State of IoT Security 2018 report found.

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